Movember fundraiser, William Heath,12, disguised himself as moustached characters

Despite being unable to grow facial hair, William Heath from Northamptonshire, is the eight biggest fundraiser for this year's Movember campaign, having dressed up as famous moustached characters to raise money.

DROWNING is among leading causes of childhood death, WHO warns

The World Health Organisation warns that drowning is a 'serious and neglected' global health issue as 40 people an hour drown worldwide - putting it among the top 10 causes of childhood death.

The Food You Should Pack for Lunch Every Day

You’ll never be starving an hour later again.

This article was written by Catherine Lamb and repurposed with permission from Food52.

Here’s how to stave off lunchtime boredom: Go to the store and buy a dozen eggs. Boil them. Return the eggs to their carton, label them assertively to ward off peckish coworkers, and store them in your office mini-fridge. Voilà: There’s your ticket to dependably satisfying lunches.

Hardboiled eggs are a breeze to cook. They last forever. They’re cheap, versatile, and just plain delicious. Plus, they’ve got enough protein to get you through your 3 p.m. conference call or give you the motivational push you need to finally make it to that hot yoga class you’ve heard so much about.

Here’s how to enjoy hardboiled eggs for lunch every which way.

James Ransom

Boil it Just Right
Go the lazy route: Gently slip your eggs into boiling water and let them go for seven minutes, which will result in a semi-firm, bright-orange yolk with just enough gooey give. Be sure to time your eggs exactly so you don’t end up with a runny middle or a chalky, grey yolk. You could also follow this method, but that requires a little bit more diligence and a larger attention span.

When you bring your eggs into the office, be sure to pack some salt (extra points for the fancy stuff) and freshly ground pepper in a little baggie or container. You might as well start stashing some of both in your office drawer—a sprinkle will bring a little spark to your reheated soups and last night’s leftovers. You can even wrap your eggs and seasoning up together in bundles of parchment so they're ready to eat at a moment's notice.

Plate hardboiled eggs alongside hummus or baba ghanoush and vegetable slices, and you’ve got one of those excellent lunches that feels good, is interactive and snack-y, and can also hang out on your desk for a few hours if the mini-fridge is too packed.
 

James Ransom

Serve Atop Salads
You can also use your eggs to bolster salads (like this one) or add them to soups. Or make hardboiled eggs the stars of the show, and turn them into an egg salad or potato salad.

Hardboiled eggs are also there to add heft and protein to sandwiches (and save you from the threat of another humdrum ham and cheese.) I like to fan sliced eggs on top of bread with a spread of refried beans or hummus, layer them on a baguette on top of avocado, kale, and Caesar dressing, or tuck them into a Mediterranean-inspired pita sandwich.

If I leave you with one thought, let it be this: When in doubt (or in a crunch for time), hardboil. You’ve got lunch.

More from Food52:
The Best Way to Peel Hard Boiled Eggs 
How to Make Street-Style Chinese Tea Eggs at Home 
13 Ways to Eat Eggs for Dinner

 

hard-boiled-eggs_1.jpg

New 15-minute Ebola test to be trialled in Guinea

The trial, funded by the Wellcome Trust and UK Government, will be deployed using a 'mobile suitcase' laboratory, with a solar panel, power pack and results reader the size of a small laptop.

Aimee Willett’s first smear test revealed she has terminal cancer 

Aimee Willett, 26, of Sittingbourne, Kent (pictured right), is calling for the national smear test age to be lowered, as she was found to have cancer on her first test at age 25.

Delicious Ways to Mix Jicama and Orange

C in the spotlight! Both jicama and oranges are packed with the potent antioxidant vitamin.

Some foods, weirdly enough, just taste better together. Try these four jicama and orange recipes to see for yourself.
 

Romulo Yanes

Seared Tuna with Orange and Jicama Salsa
4 yellowfin tuna steaks (6 oz each)
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
2 tsp olive oil

Salsa
2 oranges
2 cups grated jicama
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1 Tbsp finely chopped red chili pepper
1 1/2 tsp grated fresh ginger 1 pinch salt

Zest one orange, then segment both over a bowl, reserving any juice. Combine orange segments, juice, and zest with remaining salsa ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Remove tuna from fridge 10 minutes prior to cooking and season both sides with salt and pepper. Heat oil in a large skillet over high heat. Sear tuna for 2 minutes, flip, then sear 1 to 2 minutes longer. Using tongs, sear the edges. Serve with salsa.

Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 270 cal, 4 g fat (l g sat), 15 g carbs, 7 g sugar, 390 mg sodium, 5 g fiber, 41 g protein

 

Three More Delicious Recipes
1. Turkey club wrap:
In a small bowl, mash 1 avocado with a fork. Peel and segment 1 orange over the bowl, squeezing juice from the membranes, and combine with avocado. Spread each of 4 large lettuce leaves (iceberg, romaine, or red leaf) with 1/4 of the avocado mixture. Top each with 1 oz deli turkey; 1 oz thinly sliced jicama; 1/2 slice cooked bacon, crumbled; 1/2 tomato, halved and sliced; and 1 Tbsp dried cranberries. Roll each leaf like a burrito and cut in the middle, securing each half with a toothpick. Serves 4.

2. Spicy roasted jicama and oranges: Cut 1 pound peeled jicama into logs 2 to 3 inches long and about 1/2 inch thick. Cut 2 oranges into 8 wedges, remove the center pith, then cut the wedges in half crosswise. Toss the jicama and oranges with 2 tsp olive oil and 4 1/2 tsp fajita seasoning mix. Spread on a parchment-lined baking sheet and roast in a preheated 400°F oven for 20 minutes, stirring once about halfway through. Cool slightly before serving. Serves 4.

3. Jicama-orange salad: Peel 1 pound jicama and cut into matchsticks. Thinly slice 4 scallions and 8 radishes and toss with jicama. In a small bowl, whisk together 1/4 cup fresh lime juice, 4 tsp extra-virgin olive oil, and 4 tsp honey. Pour liquid over jicama mixture and toss to coat. Peel and cut 4 oranges into about 6 slices each, dividing among 4 plates. Loosely pile the jicama mixture in the center of the oranges. Serves 4.

More from Women's Health:
8 Delicious and Healthy Recipes with Citrus Ingredients
5 Foods with More Vitamin C Than an Orange
Tastes Better Together: Beet and Dill

jicama-orange.jpg

Chinese woman has breast reduction surgery to remove ONE STONE of tissue

Mrs Lin, 50, from Xiamen, Fujian Province, China, had one stone of fat removed from her breasts. The surgeon carrying out the procedure said they were the biggest he had seen in his whole career.

Soaring numbers of Korean women having pubic hair transplants to combat hair loss condition

One Korean clinic offering the procedure estimates 10 per cent of women suffer from pubic atrichosis, which means they lack pubic hair - a sign of health and fertility in Korean culture.

Are you at risk of leukaemia? Scientists identify mutation can predict if a person will develop blood cancer within five years

Scientists at Harvard Medical School found carriers of the mutations had a five per cent risk of developing blood cancers including leukaemia and lymphoma within five years.

How to Bounce Back After a Food Binge

Too full to move? We can fix that.

This article was written by Maria Hart and repurposed with permission from Greatist.

'Tis the season to overdo it with stuffing, turkey, buttery rolls, and pie. With all the office parties, cookie swaps, and holiday potlucks this time of year, it's especially hard to avoid overeating. But really, stuffing yourself rotten isn't limited to the holidays. Sometimes that late-night frozen pizza somehow becomes a single serving with gut-busting repercussions.

Hey, it happens to the best of us. But the real problem is usually what happens after—in our body and our mind.

Are you filled with regret, dejectedly pondering starting a juice cleanse? Or do you feel the urge to go for broke, double down, and top it all off with a big bowl of froyo? Do you wallow in the damage for hours or even days?

And physically, do you fall into a food coma? Get that feeling like your food has turned to concrete in your abdomen or suffer from hours of nausea and discomfort?

Don't fret. Sometimes reframing the situation and having an action plan is all you need to rebound ASAP.

Think About the Situation Differently
It can be easy to beat yourself up. Things like "no self-control," "lazy," and "gross" can get thrown around. Maybe you run five miles and end up making yourself sick. Or swear off eating for an entire day. It's super-easy to treat your body to all types of abuse post-gorgefest, but here's where taking a step outside yourself is critical.

As the custodian for your body, you’re responsible for its care—just like you’d be responsible for a child that you’re babysitting. Imagine finding this kid knee-deep in candy bar wrappers, halfway into an all-out candy binge. Caught red-handed, this kid looks up at you, terrified, ashamed, awaiting punishment. What do you do? Do you yell insults at the child? March him or her over to the treadmill to run off every last calorie? Of course not. With that in mind, let any name calling and punishment stop. You will treat yourself with the same compassion you would treat this child.

Why is this helpful? In his book The Marshmallow Test, psychologist Walter Mischel, Ph.D., a professor at Columbia, describes how emotional situations like this can stay in a heated place, which could lead to more self-destructive or self-punishing behavior. To counter that, it helps to cool your distress by "self-distancing" and entering into "cognitive reappraisal." In other words, viewing yourself from a distance or as another (like a child) helps engage a cool, rational reaction where you can regroup and rebound.

So what should you do to regroup? We're glad you asked.

Take Action immediately
Let's handle the physical symptoms for bloating and food coma first.

Don't let the weight of your food baby take you down for the count (or straight to the couch). Lying down can give you heartburn and other gastro issues. It can even aggravate respiratory issues for people with asthma.

Do get moving. Light exercise is the best thing you can do to help your body bounce back. Operative word: light. Jogging around the block might not be smart, thanks to the high barf factor, but taking a walk can do a world of good. Not only does it speed up digestion, it'll also even out your blood sugar and clear glucose out of your bloodstream. Another idea is light yoga. Certain twisting poses have been known to assist and alleviate digestive woes.

Don't drink alcohol or coffee. Knocking back a boozy "digestif" drink after a calorie rager is a common practice for many, but they don't actually assist with digestion. In fact, alcohol can pump the breaks on your body's digestive process. Coffee may swing you back up from a food slump with a jolt of caffeine, but it also doesn't do any good for digestion.

Do drink water, seltzer, or teas. It might seem counterintuitive to drink water when your belly is full to bursting, but H2O helps move along digestion.  It can also battle sodium and carb bloat, and it’s a preemptive strike against any post-gluttony constipation. You can also try seltzer, which is proven to relieve indigestion. Herbal teas with ginger, peppermint, and fennel have been shown to ease that I'm-so-stuffed feeling. In short, keep these liquids coming.

Click HERE to learn the next step to fighting a food coma from Greatist!

More from Greatist:
What to Say When People Annoyingly Undermine Your Healthy Choices
The Ultimate Illustrated Guide to Planning a Healthy Thanksgiving
The Best Free Workout Videos on YouTube

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‘Wonder’ drug could cure binge drinking, Alzheimer’s AND dementia, scientists claim

Scientists at the University of Huddersfield found the drug ethane-beta-sultam was able to pass through the brain's natural defence barrier reducing the loss of brain cells which causes poor memory.

What 9 Women’s Health Editors Eat for Breakfast Each Morning

Get a glimpse of the go-to foods we chew to fuel our day.
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Weight Loss Success Story: How One Woman Shed Over 100 Pounds and Changed Her Life

Leanna Reiling's small steps made a big difference.

Before: 256 lbs
After: 149 lbs

Leanna Reiling, a 32-year-old project manager from Beaverton, Oregon, rarely ate fresh fruits and veggies as a teen, preferring comfort foods like cheeseburgers and beef stroganoff. As she entered her 20s, her waistline only grew. "It was a downward spiral," she says. After a long day on the job, she'd plop onto the couch with a bowl of cheesy pasta and watch TV until she fell asleep. By age 29, Leanna, at 5'0", weighed over 250 pounds.

The Change
Leanna's mother died at age 47 due to complications from obesity. Leanna was devastated and feared she'd face the same fate if she continued her ways. But it was only after she gave birth to her son in April 2011 that her diet and exercise routine got a real kick-start. As Leanna sat with her infant son watching an episode of Extreme Weight Loss, she cried as she related to the overweight women on the show. She couldn't shake the feeling that she was bound to miss out on important moments in her son's life. "I just looked at him and thought, It's time," she says.

The Lifestyle
Instead of deleting entire food groups, Leanna paid attention to portions and measured what she ate. She also bought an elliptical machine and logged 15 minutes of cardio each day. "I tried strength circuits I found online, too," she says. "I fell in love with kettlebells!" It took her about a year to shed 50 pounds, but once she got under the 200-pound mark, there was no going back. Leanna hit the kitchen to whip up breakfast smoothies and healthy salad dressings. She starting walking and then—slowly—running outside. "You could hardly call it a run back then," she says. By January 2013, she'd lost another 25 pounds. She upped her speed and distance each week and soon found herself cruising through sub-eight-minute miles. When her weight loss plateaued, she changed up her routine with calorie-torching hot yoga or a cycling class. By July 2013, Leanna's total pounds lost hit the triple digits.

The Reward
"I celebrated losing 100 pounds with designer jeans—in a size 4!" says Leanna. She loves her new body, but what she loves even more is challenging it in races—to date, Leanna has run more than 20. "It's such an amazing release," she says. Now she likes to run up tough hills while pushing her son in a stroller. "I did all of this for me and my son," she says.

Leanna's Tips
See it. "I update a vision board every month with motivational quotes and pictures from magazines [including this very page!]. It helps me stay focused on my dreams."
Know your shape. "I'll always be heavier on the bottom. I just do more squats and lunges so it's shaped nicely."
Read before you eat. "Sometimes I reach for a convenience-store muffin, but then I look at the calorie count, and it deters me from doing something I'd regret later."

More from Women's Health:
I Overhauled My Eating Habits and Lost More Than 150 Pounds
10 Alternatives for Healthy Weight-Loss Foods You Hate
9 Weight-Loss Tips for Crazy-Busy People

cardio-cure.jpg

Teenager who had no idea she was pregnant gives birth on the bathroom floor having thought she had food poisoning

Gemma Armstrong, 19, from Alness, Ross-Shire, Scotland, experienced none of the usual signs of pregnancy. She didn't even have a bump - and wore a bikini on the beach just a month before.

Two children being tested for Ebola after arriving in the UK from Africa

Two children are being tested for Ebola at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle after arriving in the UK from Africa, Public Health England has said.

Exercising the mind in complex jobs ‘boosts memory and protects the brain from ageing’

Scientists from Edinburgh University found those in teaching and management roles scored better in memory and thinking tests when they reached 70 years old.

Could living in a glass house boost your HEALTH?

A London-based company is planning to build transparent homes. The all-glass houses (artist's impression shown) come with a bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and lounge, and the walls can be tinted.

‘Off switch’ for pain discovered: Brain receptor could hold key to alleviating suffering in cancer patients

Scientists at Saint Louis University in Missouri managed to block a pain pathway in rodents with chronic neuropathic pain, which develops due to nerve damage.

Dame Sally Davies says it is crucial two to four-year-old children get flu vaccination

Only a quarter of two to four-year-olds have had the nasal flu vaccine, considerably lower than this time last year, and Britain's chief medical officer is urging parents to sign their children up.

Picking Up the Slack For Women

St. Vincent's Hospital went from lifesaver to bankrupt to closed to construction site for luxury condominiums in what seemed the twinkle of an eye in lower Manhattan. Its end created a void.

NHS spends £80m… on paracetamol: Tablets were prescribed 22million times by doctors last year

The painkiller - which is available for as little as 19p for a pack of 16 tablets in British high street stores - was prescribed by doctors 22 million times at an average cost of £3.67 in 2013/2014.

E-cigarettes ‘contain 10 TIMES more cancer-causing chemicals than regular cigarettes’

Research commissioned by the National Institute of Public Health in Japan found higher levels of chemicals formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in e-cigarettes than regular cigarettes.

One in three doctors in the UK want assisted dying legalised

A survey of 8,900 members of the Royal College of Physicians found 37 per cent were in favour of a change in law and a bill on assisted dying is currently making its way through Parliament.

Drying WASHING indoors could ‘harm your health’

Experts from the National Aspergillosis Centre in Manchester issued a warning after treating a growing number of patients who have inhaled mould spores from drying washing indoors.

Crash survivor Candace Emptage wakes up from coma thinking it was the 1990s

Candace Emptage woke up from a coma after six weeks and believed it was still the 1990s. She lost more than a decade of her memories since being in a car crash in Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, in 2010.

11 Foods That Crush Cravings

Squash your appetite before it gets out of control.

This article was adapted from The HD Diet and provided by our partners at Rodale News.

A food is considered hydrophilic if it fills up with water and, in turn, fills you up, satisfying your appetite. The term originated from the Greek words for water (hydro) and friendship (philia).

If losing weight is a goal for you, then you want to make sure you get some soluble fiber in your diet, too. Hydrophilic fibers dissolve and form a gel in the intestines. The gel helps steady blood sugar, which in turn stops food cravings and makes us feel full longer. Being well hydrated also aids digestion. Eat these foods the next time you feel the urge to hit the vending machine.

Chia Seeds
Chia seeds can absorb up to 12 times their weight in water, which means they are filling. Because they are flavorless, they can bulk up your favorite snacks and meals without compromising taste! The seeds also help maintain electrolytes to encourage hydration and the efficient absorption of nutrients. The chia seed is rich in omega-3's, antioxidants, fiber, iron, magnesium, and calcium, too.

Okra
This vegetable is high in fiber and low in calories—one cup of cooked okra is only 36 calories. Many people shy away from okra because of its slimy consistency, but you can alleviate the goo factor by adding it to soups and stir-fries. And okra is high in vitamins C, A, and B6, as well as folate, calcium, iron, potassium, and magnesium.

MORE: The Top Meat Replacements

Oatmeal
This is a breakfast favorite because it is so satisfying. Oatmeal has six grams of protein per serving and contains phosphorous, potassium, selenium, manganese, and iron. Oats also protect your cardiovascular system: A 15-year study published in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine found that oatmeal lowers cholesterol and reduces the risk of heart disease. Just make sure your oatmeal doesn't contain mercury.

Barley
This grain—which is also highly water absorbent—has a delicious, nutty flavor and a pasta-like texture. Try adding it to salads, soups, and side dishes. It is sold in three forms: hulled, pearled, and pot. We recommend the pot barley—it retains its nutritive punch and is the easiest to work with. Try this chicken-barley recipe to get started.

Pears
Fruits containing pectin—such as apples and pears—absorb tons of water. They help with digestion, lower cholesterol, and regulate the body's absorption of sugar. Eat the pear's skin—it contains the antioxidant quercetin.

MORE: 5 Freaky Stats About Added Sugar

Brussels Sprouts
Brussels sprouts have enough hydrophilic fiber to keep you full for hours. It is also a food recommended by the American Cancer Society because it contains chemicals that can stimulate enzymes in the body that detoxify carcinogens. Brussels sprouts can be steamed, sautéed, or roasted, but don't overcook them—they'll lose their nutritional value and flavor.

MORE: Control Your Cravings by Building a Healthier Gut

Kidney Beans
All beans are highly hydrophilic foods. They also decrease the risk of coronary disease. We prefer kidney beans because they are great in chili and thick soups. Use the beans instead of meat or tuna fish for the protein in a salad. Here are five more reasons to eat beans.

Oranges
Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C. Instead of peeling and disposing of the pith—the white layer beneath the orange skin—eat it. It too contains pectin and vitamin C. Oranges are also wonderful sources of vitamin A, B-complex vitamins, potassium, and calcium. When you're choosing fruit, be sure to avoid the produce on this dirty dozen list.

Agar
Agar is a gelling agent made from seaweed. Widely used in Southeast Asia, agar consists mostly of hydrophilic fibers that reabsorb glucose in the stomach, quickly pass through the digestive system, and then inhibit the body from retaining and storing excess fat. You can make delicious pudding using agar. It's easy to prepare and less than 50 calories per serving (the agar itself is calorie free).

Nori
Nori—dried seaweed—is used to wrap sushi. Nori is around 35 percent fiber, most of which is hydrophilic. It's sold in thin, flat sheets at health food stores or online.

Chickpeas
High in fiber, chickpeas will keep you full for hours. For a snack, try grabbing some crudité and making a homemade chickpea spread made with roasted chickpeas.

MORE: 14 Foods You Should Never Eat

crush-cravings.jpg

11 Foods That Crush Cravings

Squash your appetite before it gets out of control.

This article was adapted from The HD Diet and provided by our partners at Rodale News.

A food is considered hydrophilic if it fills up with water and, in turn, fills you up, satisfying your appetite. The term originated from the Greek words for water (hydro) and friendship (philia).

If losing weight is a goal for you, then you want to make sure you get some soluble fiber in your diet, too. Hydrophilic fibers dissolve and form a gel in the intestines. The gel helps steady blood sugar, which in turn stops food cravings and makes us feel full longer. Being well hydrated also aids digestion. Eat these foods the next time you feel the urge to hit the vending machine.

Chia Seeds
Chia seeds can absorb up to 12 times their weight in water, which means they are filling. Because they are flavorless, they can bulk up your favorite snacks and meals without compromising taste! The seeds also help maintain electrolytes to encourage hydration and the efficient absorption of nutrients. The chia seed is rich in omega-3's, antioxidants, fiber, iron, magnesium, and calcium, too.

Okra
This vegetable is high in fiber and low in calories—one cup of cooked okra is only 36 calories. Many people shy away from okra because of its slimy consistency, but you can alleviate the goo factor by adding it to soups and stir-fries. And okra is high in vitamins C, A, and B6, as well as folate, calcium, iron, potassium, and magnesium.

MORE: The Top Meat Replacements

Oatmeal
This is a breakfast favorite because it is so satisfying. Oatmeal has six grams of protein per serving and contains phosphorous, potassium, selenium, manganese, and iron. Oats also protect your cardiovascular system: A 15-year study published in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine found that oatmeal lowers cholesterol and reduces the risk of heart disease. Just make sure your oatmeal doesn't contain mercury.

Barley
This grain—which is also highly water absorbent—has a delicious, nutty flavor and a pasta-like texture. Try adding it to salads, soups, and side dishes. It is sold in three forms: hulled, pearled, and pot. We recommend the pot barley—it retains its nutritive punch and is the easiest to work with. Try this chicken-barley recipe to get started.

Pears
Fruits containing pectin—such as apples and pears—absorb tons of water. They help with digestion, lower cholesterol, and regulate the body's absorption of sugar. Eat the pear's skin—it contains the antioxidant quercetin.

MORE: 5 Freaky Stats About Added Sugar

Brussels Sprouts
Brussels sprouts have enough hydrophilic fiber to keep you full for hours. It is also a food recommended by the American Cancer Society because it contains chemicals that can stimulate enzymes in the body that detoxify carcinogens. Brussels sprouts can be steamed, sautéed, or roasted, but don't overcook them—they'll lose their nutritional value and flavor.

MORE: Control Your Cravings by Building a Healthier Gut

Kidney Beans
All beans are highly hydrophilic foods. They also decrease the risk of coronary disease. We prefer kidney beans because they are great in chili and thick soups. Use the beans instead of meat or tuna fish for the protein in a salad. Here are five more reasons to eat beans.

Oranges
Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C. Instead of peeling and disposing of the pith—the white layer beneath the orange skin—eat it. It too contains pectin and vitamin C. Oranges are also wonderful sources of vitamin A, B-complex vitamins, potassium, and calcium. When you're choosing fruit, be sure to avoid the produce on this dirty dozen list.

Agar
Agar is a gelling agent made from seaweed. Widely used in Southeast Asia, agar consists mostly of hydrophilic fibers that reabsorb glucose in the stomach, quickly pass through the digestive system, and then inhibit the body from retaining and storing excess fat. You can make delicious pudding using agar. It's easy to prepare and less than 50 calories per serving (the agar itself is calorie free).

Nori
Nori—dried seaweed—is used to wrap sushi. Nori is around 35 percent fiber, most of which is hydrophilic. It's sold in thin, flat sheets at health food stores or online.

Chickpeas
High in fiber, chickpeas will keep you full for hours. For a snack, try grabbing some crudité and making a homemade chickpea spread made with roasted chickpeas.

MORE: 14 Foods You Should Never Eat

crush-cravings.jpg

Commuting leads to neck, back and knee pains, poll finds

A fifth of the British workforce says their commute to and from work leaves them with neck, back and muscle pain, according to a survery published today.

Drug designed to treat lung cancer and leukaemia could also ‘reverse common form of autism’

Scientists at Edinburgh and McGill universities found the chemical cercosporamide, which is being tested to treat lung cancer and leukaemia, helps reverse some symptoms of autism.

So which foods really ARE good for you? Interactive tool reveals the truth about chia seeds, acai berries, wheatgrass and green tea

EXCLUSIVE: Data journalist David McCandless spent nine months collating scientific studies to produce the infographic rating the scientific evidence of health claims relating to different 'superfoods'.

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