Teen ‘can’t have op to close hole in heart without heart attack or stroke’

Carla Maclean, 19, from Abbeydale in Gloucestershire, is regularly out of breath, suffers palpitations and headaches and lives in fear of 'dropping dead', after being diagnosed with a hole in her heart three years ago.

Doctors remove skeleton of baby left inside mother for 36 YEARS

Doctors believe the Indian woman Kantabai Thakre, 60, may have had the world's longest ectopic pregnancy, after becoming pregnant at the age of 24, in 1978.

Mother loses more than EIGHT stone after she got stuck in chair at Disneyland

At the time of the incident Kathy Levick, 39, from County Wicklow, Ireland, weighed nearly 20st and was languishing on a four-year waiting list for a gastric band operation.

Clinical trials of ‘alternative medicines are damaging and a waste of money’

The U.S. scientists David Gorski and Steven Novella launched a blistering attack on the 'highly implausible' treatments, including homeopathy and reiki, claiming the treatments have 'been proved to have no benefits whatsoever'.

Texas Faces Barriers To Signing Immigrants Up For Coverage

Outreach is also proving a big barrier to signing Latinos up for health insurance in California, many say.

Texas Tribune: Glitches Threaten ACA Coverage For Some Immigrants
Health advocates helping the state’s minority population say they’ve been working to overcome language barriers, technical issues and low awareness of who is eligible to obtain coverage under the federal health law. With the first enrollment period closed, enrollees are now dealing with inconsistencies in their applications, which are detected when the marketplace website finds a data matching issue between the reported citizenship information and the information the government has on file for an individual (Ura, 8/21).

The California Health Report: Hurdles Remain to Signing Up More Latinos For Health Coverage
As a college-prep consultant, Marina Grijalva heard about the Affordable Care Act and how it would enable her to sign up for health insurance. But the enrollment campaigns -- which the state poured tens of millions of dollars into -- didn't reach her sister or many other Latinos. Had Grijalva not informed her sister of the new health law and walked her through the enrollment process, the 53-year-old woman may have remained uninsured this year. She would not have been alone (Kritz, 8/20).

Elsewhere, salary and benefits are cutting into hospital profits --

Modern Healthcare: Hospitals See More Paying Patients, But There’s a Hitch
Insurance expansion under health care reform is starting to yield patient volume for hospitals, but the costs of staffing up for more patients are eclipsing the additional revenue. Earnings reports for not-for-profit systems in the first half of the year show that many providers are seeing rising salary and benefit expenses cut into revenue gains, leading to smaller operating surpluses (Kutscher, 8/20).

Wind turbines are NOT making you sick, report claims

A report by the Energy and Policy Institute in Washington DC has found that claims of sickness being caused by wind turbines (shown) are not being upheld by courts around the world.

Sen. Pryor Debuts Campaign Ad Embracing Health Law Provisions

The Arkansas Democrat, who is in a tough reelection fight, talked about his own struggle with cancer and how the health law provisions that prohibit insurance companies from denying coverage to people with medical problems could have helped him.

The Associated Press: Pryor's 'Obamacare' Ad Highlights His Cancer Fight
U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor reached into his own medical history Tuesday to explain his vote on the nation's new health care law, telling Arkansans his battle with a rare cancer 18 years ago influenced him. The two-term Democrat, who is in a tough re-election battle, fought a clear-cell sarcoma discovered after a pickup basketball game. He had five weeks of chemotherapy and a 13-hour surgery that his campaign called experimental (8/20).

The Wall Street Journal's Washington Wire: Democrat Pryor Embraces Obama Health-Care Law In Ad
Mr. Pryor discusses his own battle with cancer and appears for the first time in a campaign ad with his father, former Sen. and Gov. David Pryor, one of the state’s most popular Democrats. Although the senator does not mention the Affordable Care Act by name, he touts his support for the law proudly after his father mentions that his son's insurance company didn't want to pay for treatment after he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer in 1996 (Hook, 8/20).

The Hill: Pryor Touts Vote For O-Care In New Ad
"When Mark was diagnosed with cancer, we thought we might lose him," David Pryor says in the ad. "Mark's insurance company didn't want to pay for the treatment that ultimately saved his life." The younger Pryor then cites ObamaCare regulations that force insurance companies to provide coverage for pre-existing conditions (Joseph, 8/20).

Bloomberg/Businessweek: Democrat Runs On Obamacare Without Mentioning Obamacare
A Democratic politician fighting for reelection is using a strategy few would have imagined six months ago: Arkansas Senator Mark Pryor just released a new ad boasting about his yea vote for Obamacare. Well, sort of. The ad never mentions the Affordable Care Act by name. Instead, it begins with Pryor and his father talking about the senator’s own cancer treatment and fighting with his insurer to get it covered (Tozzi, 8/20).

Handicapping How ‘Obamacare,’ Other Health Issues Play Into Campaigns

The New York Times examines how the outcome of midterm elections and subsequent efforts to replace parts of the health law could factor into the presidential campaign landscape. Meanwhile, a recent poll notes that small business owners are less concerned about the health law than previously.

The New York Times: Loss For Democrats In Midterm Elections Could Be Boon For Clinton
“A Republican Congress will present an inviting contrast and easily understood negative for whoever runs for president as a Democrat,” said Anita Dunn, a former White House communications director for Mr. Obama. At the same time, she added, “The president will have two more years to get things done, and clearly, a Democratic Senate would be better for that.” As little as Congress is doing now, losing the Senate beachhead poses numerous dangers to Mr. Obama’s agenda. Republicans would control which of his appointees receive confirmation votes, and how quickly. They could, as their House counterparts have done, initiate investigations of the administration. They could make him use his veto pen to fend off legislation impeding his climate-change initiative or repealing parts of the health care law. They could seek smaller compromises on trade, infrastructure or business taxation on terms that force Mr. Obama to choose between alienating his Democratic base or accomplishing nothing further before leaving office (Harwood, 8/20).

The Washington Post: Small Business Owners Aiming To Unseat Incumbents In Midterms, Poll Shows 
“It’s important for politicians to hear their voice and focus on issues relevant to this community,” John Swanciger, Manta’s chief executive, said in the company’s report. So, what issues are those? Not surprisingly, a third of the respondents said the economy still represents the country’s greatest challenge, more than any other issue presented in the survey. Manta polled more than 1,500 owners and reported a margin of error of just below 3 percent. Conversely, health care, which has been one of the most controversial political issues for small firms in recent years, has fallen to fourth on that list, now behind immigration issues and income inequality (Harrison, 8/20).

Meanwhile, Planned Parenthood steps onto the Alaska Senate campaign trail --

The Hill: Planned Parenthood Attacks Alaska Republican Senate Candidate
Planned Parenthood's political arm is launching its largest ad buy so far this cycle against Alaska's freshly minted Republican Senate candidate. Planned Parenthood Action Fund debuted its digital ad campaign against Dan Sullivan less than 12 hours after the GOP establishment pick won his primary to challenge Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska) in November. The effort seeks to highlight Sullivan's opposition to abortion, government funding for Planned Parenthood and ObamaCare's birth control coverage mandate (Viebeck, 8/20).

Poll: Californians Support Stronger Regulation Of Insurance Rates

The ballot initiative, which will likely be the subject of a costly campaign battle, is championed by consumer groups but opposed by many in the medical and insurance industries.

Los Angeles Times: Poll: 69% Favor Prop. 45 Measure On Regulating Health Insurance Rates
A new poll shows 69 percent of California voters back Proposition 45, a November ballot measure giving the insurance commissioner the power to stop excessive health-insurance rate increases. The Field Poll released Wednesday indicates broad support statewide for Proposition 45 ahead of what's expected to be a costly and contentious battle between consumer groups and health insurers (Terhune, 8/20).

Kaiser Health News: Californians Favor Tougher Rules On Health Insurance Rates, Survey Says
California voters are showing strong early support for a ballot initiative that would expand the state's authority to regulate health insurance rates. Nearly 7 of every 10 respondents indicated that they would vote in favor of Proposition 45, while 16 percent would vote against it, according to an independent poll released Wednesday by the Field Research Corp. in San Francisco (Shen, 8/20).

The Sacramento Bee: Field Poll: Strong Support For California Health Insurance Rate-Regulation Measure
The survey comes ahead of what are expected to be two of the most expensive and hard-fought statewide campaigns of the election cycle. Proponents of the measures include the politically influential trial attorneys and consumer groups who argue more must be done to prevent steep health insurance rate increases and to deter negligence by making doctors accountable for their medical errors. Opponents from the powerful medical and insurance industries argue the measures concentrate too much power under one politician and stand to financially benefit supporters at great expense to taxpayers (Cadelago, 8/20).

Contra Costa Times: Poll: Californians Strongly Support Measure Regulating Health Insurance Rates
The measure is being championed by Consumer Watchdog, the same group that pushed through a landmark 1988 proposition that created an elected California insurance commissioner and required insurers to publicly justify auto and homeowner's insurance rate changes and get the commissioner's approval before they go into effect. Proposition 45 would extend that requirement to include health insurance (Seipel, 8/20).

Viewpoints: ‘Raw Judicial Politics’ On Health Law; Texas Abortion Trial; Suicide And Gender

The New York Times: By Any Means Necessary
The Affordable Care Act -- Obamacare -- has endured so many near-death experiences that digging into the details of still another effort to demolish it is admittedly not an inviting prospect. (My own reaction, I confess, to hearing some months back about the latest legal challenge -- this one aimed at the supposed effect of a single word in the 900-page statute -- was something along the lines of "wake me when it's over.") But stay with me, because this latest round, catapulted onto the Supreme Court's docket earlier this month by the same forces that brought us the failed Commerce Clause attack two years ago, opens a window on raw judicial politics so extreme that the saga so far would be funny if the potential consequences weren’t so serious (Linda Greenhouse, 8/20). 

Bloomberg: Republicans Won't Have Obamacare Forever
[Arkansas Sen. Mark] Pryor doesn't say that he helped pass "Obamacare," or even that he helped pass the "Affordable Care Act." Instead, he simply touts provisions of the law that almost certainly sound good to most people, saying that he "helped pass a law that prevents insurance companies from canceling your policy if you get sick, or deny coverage for preexisting conditions." The wrong way to think about this is to imagine that the ACA is getting more popular. It isn’t .... But what this does get to is that individual provisions of the law (especially, naturally, the benefits) have always polled well, and the Republican solution -- repeal -- is even more unpopular than the law itself (Jonathan Bernstein, 8/20).

The New York Times: Quackery And Abortion Rights
The deception behind the wave of state-level abortion restrictions now threatening women’s access to safe and legal abortions was strikingly revealed during a trial that ended last week in Texas (8/20). 

The New York Times' Room For Debate: When Do Doctors Have The Right To Speak?
Two federal appellate court decisions, one allowing Florida to prevent doctors from discussing gun safety with patients, the other letting California ban "gay-conversion" therapy, raise questions about health professionals' First Amendment rights. Do occupational-licensing laws trump the First Amendment? What limits, if any, does the First Amendment impose on government's ability to restrict advice? (8/20). 

The Wall Street Journal: The Golden Age Of Neuroscience Has Arrived
More than a billion people were amazed this summer when a 29-year-old paraplegic man from Brazil raised his right leg and kicked a soccer ball to ceremonially begin the World Cup. The sight of a paralyzed person whose brain directly controlled a robotic exoskeleton (designed at Duke University) was thrilling. We are now entering the golden age of neuroscience. We have learned more about the thinking brain in the last 10-15 years than in all of previous human history (Michio Kaku, 8/20). 

The Wall Street Journal: FedEx's 'Money Laundering' Scheme
According to U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of California Melinda Haag's revised indictment, FedEx engaged in a "conspiracy to launder" more than $630,000 in payments from shipping drugs sold illegally by online pharmacies. Justice accuses FedEx of conspiring to launder money because it "requested payment for providing shipping services" to such fly-by-night pharmacies via wire transfers, checks, direct debits, credit card charges and telephone. But as we wrote last week, FedEx had no way of knowing which pharmacies were violating the law by filling orders without valid prescriptions, and Justice hasn't provided FedEx with a list. Even if employees ripped open packages, they wouldn't be able to finger the contraband (8/20). 

Bloomberg: Why Do More Men Commit Suicide?
Robin Williams's death has brought welcome attention to the very real problem of suicide in the U.S. From 2000 to 2011, suicides increased to 12.3 per 100,000 people from 10.4. Deaths by suicide now exceed those from motor-vehicle accidents. This is not, as you might think, a problem occurring disproportionately among teenagers or the very old. The people most prone to taking their own lives are those 45 to 59 years old .... What puzzles researchers even more is that men commit suicide more often than women do -- about four times as often -- even though most studies find that women are twice as likely to be depressed and also more likely to have suicidal thoughts (Peter R. Orszag, 8/20).

The New England Journal Of Medicine: The Impact And Evolution Of Medicare Part D
Many ACA provisions position Medicare for major payment and delivery-system changes that are designed to improve quality and reduce spending growth. These reforms include altering provider reimbursement to encourage efficiency and improving care coordination among providers. In some ways, the Part D program, which is run by stand-alone plans that don't carry risk for total medical spending and have no financial relationships with providers, is out of sync with such changes. ... [T]he long-term success of payment and delivery-system reforms will depend in part on integrating Part D policy with broader reforms (Julie M. Donohue, 8/21).

The New England Journal Of Medicine: Did Hospital Engagement Networks Actually Improve Care?
Everyone with a role in health care wants to improve the quality and safety of our delivery system. Recently, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released results of its Partnership for Patients Program (PPP) and celebrated large improvements in patient outcomes. But the PPP's weak study design and methods, combined with a lack of transparency and rigor in evaluation, make it difficult to determine whether the program improved care. ... [T]he failure to generate valid, reliable information hampers our ability to improve future interventions, because we are no closer to understanding how to improve care than we were before the PPP (Drs. Peter Pronovost and Ashish K. Jha, 8/21).

One in five Dignitas suicide tourists is from the UK

A study found a doubling of the number of people of all nationalities travelling to Dignitas in Zurich, an organisation founded to help people with terminal and incurable illnesses end their own lives.

Richard Dawkins says foetuses with Down’s syndrome should be aborted

A discussion began when Dawkins posted a link to an article in liberal US magazine New Repbulic entitled 'The Catholic Church prefers medieval barbarism to modern abortion'.

Girl, 4, can only whisper due to tumours growing on her vocal cords

Ellie Dixon, four, from Irlam in Greater Manchester, was diagnosed with respiratory papillomas, a condition which causes wart-like growths to appear on the vocal chords and voice box.

First Edition: August 21, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including reports about a new "Obamacare" ad in the Arkansas Senate race and a California poll measuring how the state's voters feel about a ballot initiative that would expand the state's ability to regulate health insurance rates.

Kaiser Health News: Californians Favor Tougher Rules On Health Insurance Rates, Survey Says
Reporting for Kaiser Health News, Helen Shen writes: “California voters are showing strong early support for a ballot initiative that would expand the state's authority to regulate health insurance rates. Nearly 7 of every 10 respondents indicated that they would vote in favor of Proposition 45, while 16 percent would vote against it, according to an independent poll released Wednesday by the Field Research Corp. in San Francisco” (Shen, 8/20). Read the story.

Kaiser Health News: Are Your Medical Records Vulnerable To Theft?
Reporting for Kaiser Health News, Eric Whitney writes: “A decade ago almost all doctors kept paper charts on every patient. That is changing quickly as laptops become as common as stethoscopes in exam rooms. Recent hacking attacks have raised questions about how safe that data may be. Here are some frequently asked questions about this evolution underway in American medicine and the government programs sparking the change” (Whitney, 8/21). Read the story, which also ran in CNN Money.

The New York Times: Loss For Democrats In Midterm Elections Could Be Boon For Clinton
“A Republican Congress will present an inviting contrast and easily understood negative for whoever runs for president as a Democrat,” said Anita Dunn, a former White House communications director for Mr. Obama. At the same time, she added, “The president will have two more years to get things done, and clearly, a Democratic Senate would be better for that.” As little as Congress is doing now, losing the Senate beachhead poses numerous dangers to Mr. Obama’s agenda. Republicans would control which of his appointees receive confirmation votes, and how quickly. They could, as their House counterparts have done, initiate investigations of the administration. They could make him use his veto pen to fend off legislation impeding his climate-change initiative or repealing parts of the health care law. They could seek smaller compromises on trade, infrastructure or business taxation on terms that force Mr. Obama to choose between alienating his Democratic base or accomplishing nothing further before leaving office (Harwood, 8/20).

The Washington Post: Small Business Owners Aiming To Unseat Incumbents In Midterms, Poll Shows 
“It’s important for politicians to hear their voice and focus on issues relevant to this community,” John Swanciger, Manta’s chief executive, said in the company’s report. So, what issues are those? Not surprisingly, a third of the respondents said the economy still represents the country’s greatest challenge, more than any other issue presented in the survey. Manta polled more than 1,500 owners and reported a margin of error of just below 3 percent. Conversely, health care, which has been one of the most controversial political issues for small firms in recent years, has fallen to fourth on that list, now behind immigration issues and income inequality (Harrison, 8/20).

The Associated Press: Pryor’s ‘Obamacare’ Ad Highlights His Cancer Fight
U.S. Sen. Mark Pryor reached into his own medical history Tuesday to explain his vote on the nation’s new health care law, telling Arkansans his battle with a rare cancer 18 years ago influenced him. The two-term Democrat, who is in a tough re-election battle, fought a clear-cell sarcoma discovered after a pickup basketball game. He had five weeks of chemotherapy and a 13-hour surgery that his campaign called experimental (8/20).

The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire: Democrat Pryor Embraces Obama Health-Care Law In Ad
Mr. Pryor discusses his own battle with cancer and appears for the first time in a campaign ad with his father, former Sen. and Gov. David Pryor, one of the state’s most popular Democrats. Although the senator does not mention the Affordable Care Act by name, he touts his support for the law proudly after his father mentions that his son’s insurance company didn’t want to pay for treatment after he was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer in 1996 (Hook, 8/20).

The Washington Post: GOP Win In Southwest Virginia Senate Race Secures Republican Control Of Legislature
The Senate election was the most important of the day given its impact on Richmond’s upper chamber. Republicans already dominate the House, so the GOP victory in the Senate put the General Assembly fully in the hands of a party that opposes the Democratic governor’s top policy aims (Vozzella and Robinson, 8/19).

The Associated Press: Republican Wins Special Va. State Senate Race
The seat was previously held by conservative Democrat Phil Puckett. His abrupt resignation in June gave control of the Senate to Republicans, who used their new leverage to prevail against McAuliffe in a monthslong showdown over whether the state budget should include Medicaid expansion. A possible job offer to Puckett by the GOP-controlled Virginia tobacco commission at the time of his resignation is the subject of an FBI investigation (8/19).

Los Angeles Times: Poll: 69% Favor Prop. 45 Measure On Regulating Health Insurance Rates
A new poll shows 69% of California voters back Proposition 45, a November ballot measure giving the insurance commissioner the power to stop excessive health-insurance rate increases. The Field Poll released Wednesday indicates broad support statewide for Proposition 45 ahead of what's expected to be a costly and contentious battle between consumer groups and health insurers (Terhune, 8/20).

Los Angeles Times: State Audits Find Prison, Hospital Payroll Abuses
Audits of a state prison and psychiatric hospital detail hundreds of thousands of dollars in improper payments and financial problems, including outright payroll fraud, and medical staff and guards receiving questionable bonuses and holiday pay, according to reports released Wednesday (St. John, 8/20).

NPR: How Much Bigger Is The Ebola Outbreak Than Official Reports?
The latest numbers on the Ebola outbreak are grim: 2,473 people infected and 1,350 deaths. That's the World Health Organization's official tally of confirmed, probable and suspect cases across Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. But the WHO has previously warned that its official figures may "vastly underestimate the magnitude of the outbreak" (Greenfieldboyce, 8/21). 

 

Check out all of Kaiser Health News' e-mail options including First Edition and Breaking News alerts on our Subscriptions page.

Exercise may protect older women from irregular heartbeat

Increasing the amount or intensity of physical activity can cut the chances of older women developing a life-threatening irregular heartbeat, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association .

Pregnant ‘tanorexic’ is diagnosed with skin cancer after tiny blemish on her nose turns into ‘rodent ulcer’

WARNING GRAPHIC CONTENT: Jo Irving, 32, from Blackpool, was diagnosed with a basal cell carcinoma - the most common form of skin cancer - when pregnant with her son Ryley, in April 2012.

How being fat in your 30s could triple the risk of dementia

Oxford University researchers have discovered people who are overweight in their 30s are at the highest risk of developing dementia.

Ohio clinic to halt surgical abortions due to 2013 state law

A suburban Cincinnati clinic will stop performing surgical abortions as a result of a 2013 state law that bars agreements to move women needing emergency care to public hospitals, an attorney for the clinic said on Wednesday.

Billionaire Environmentalist Hits Cory Gardner With First Attack Ad

California billionaire Tom Steyer's political action committee rolled out its first attack ad against Republican Rep. Cory Gardner in Colorado's Senate race.

Trousers with 50 INCH waistlines on sale for obese schoolchildren

Many are needing new plus-size clothing, with one in 10 Reception pupils and one in five Year 6 students now obese, according to the National Obesity Observatory.

One in five Dignitas suicide tourists is from the UK

A study found a doubling of the number of people of all nationalities travelling to Dignitas in Zurich, an organisation founded to help people with terminal and incurable illnesses end their own lives.

How anti-formula milk fanatics are putting babies’ health in danger

As new mothers Ellie Mulligan (left) and Natalie Murray (right) were told breastfeeding was their only option. But it proved to be to the detriment of their babies' health

NHS agrees to review nurses’ ‘do not resuscitate’ interviews

The NHS has agreed to review controversial guidelines that instruct nurses to ask the elderly whether they would agree to a ‘do not resuscitate’ order.

Dr Michael Moseley on why everything you think you know about exercise is WRONG!

Dr Michael Mosley believes gruelling workouts are not the secret to winning the battle of the bulge. In fact, he says it can cause some people to struggle to slim

Retired hubby syndrome: Wives suffer stress and depression when men quit work (and it’s worse each year)

Researchers from the University of Padova, Italy, say that women can suffer 'stress, higher depression or inability to sleep' once their husbands retire.

Revealed, the reason why it’s so difficult to sleep in old age: We lose the switch that enables us to nod off

Harvard researchers have identified a group of cells in the brain which block off conscious thoughts, allowing us to sleep.

9 Ways to FINALLY Lose That Stubborn Belly Fat

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Patient perspectives on breast reconstruction following mastectomy

Less than 42 percent of women underwent breast reconstruction following a mastectomy for cancer , and the factors associated with foregoing reconstruction included being black, having a lower education level and being older.

A special New York clinic opens up to women with vaginal issues

As we age, our bodies succumb to gravity, and that includes our genitals. Urologist Dr. Jennifer Berman explains how age and childbirth can affect the genitals.

7 Perfect Plum Smoothies

They're like a party for your taste buds!

Plums are so juicy and flavorful in the summertime, but those huge pits in the center are no fun. So do yourself a favor: Cut out the middleman (or in this case seed!), and make one of these seven refreshing sips. Yum!


Plums and blackberries are a match made in smoothie heaven. Add texture and a little tang with a banana and some lemon juice.
 


Blending up plums, a banana, and lime juice makes for such a pretty-colored smoothie!
 


Flower vase or smoothie? Both! This beverage includes plum, banana, spinach, and coconut water.
 


You wouldn't guess just by looking at it, but this drink contains plums, ground cinnamon, and cardamom. For an extra burst of fun, top with oats, a cinnamon stick, and almonds.
 


Aww, how cute does this look? To make it, just combine plums, grape juice, yogurt (@celinakonczak uses soy), and almond (or soy) milk.
 


This blend of plums, oranges, peaches, and kale will keep you cool on even the hottest summer day.
 


Presenting... dessert! The base concoction has chocolate cream, banana, coconut oil, honey, and almond milk. And for a sweet topping, drizzle a plum sauce made with plums, water, brown sugar, cinnamon, and coconut shavings over everything.

It's YOUR turn for your smoothie to be on our site! Next week, we'll be sharing smoothies made with #papaya on our site. Tag @WomensHealthMag in your #PapayaSmoothie photos on Instagram for the chance to be featured. Just remember to include the entire recipe in your caption so our readers know how to recreate your yummy concoction.

More from Women's Health:
The 5 Fruits with the Highest—and Lowest—Sugar Counts
4 Foods You Should Avoid Now If You Want to Get Pregnant Later
5 Awesome Side Effects of Eating Healthier

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